Friday, January 27, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Wisconsin's Wilmot Mountain ups its game after $13 million renovation" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Wisconsin's Wilmot Mountain ups its game after $13 million renovation" from the Chicago Tribune

One of my most memorable ski experiences didn't come while whooshing down the mountains of Aspen or cruising the jagged peaks of Jackson Hole. It was standing in line in Wisconsin.

It was five or so years ago after a fresh snow, and I'd driven about 90 minutes to Wilmot Mountain, the ski area that hugs the Illinois border in southern Wisconsin, during the week between Christmas and New Year's. My time in the car was rewarded with three hours of standing in line to get a lift ticket and rental equipment.

Three hours!

I didn't get on the slopes until 1 p.m.

(I didn't say it was a good memorable experience.)

When I shared that story with Wilmot Mountain's new general manager, Taylor Ogilvie, he barely raised an eyebrow. As soon as industry behemoth Vail Resorts bought Wilmot in early 2016, such inefficiencies were obvious at what had been operated as a mom-and-pop shop since its founding in 1938, Ogilvie said.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-new-wilmot-mountain-wisconsin-travel-0115-20161229-story.html

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Kentucky bourbon trail buzzing with more than 1M visits" from the Detroit News

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Kentucky bourbon trail buzzing with more than 1M visits" from the Detroit News

Louisville Ky. — Forget the bottle, a record number of people are experiencing Kentucky bourbon from the barrel, touring distilleries where they can sniff, sip and see whiskey crafted from the source. 

Tourism in the heart of bourbon country, on the upswing for years, reached a milestone in 2016. Visitors made more than 1 million stops at distilleries along the Kentucky Bourbon Trail and Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour last year, the Kentucky Distillers’ Association said Wednesday.

It shows that “people don’t just want what’s in the bottle,” association president Eric Gregory said. “They have a thirst for Kentucky’s bourbon culture.”

Many tourists visit multiple distilleries and each stop is counted as a visit, the group said.

The tour started in 1999 and has ridden a wave of popularity as the bourbon and whiskey industries enjoyed growing sales worldwide, in part driven by higher demand for premium spirits and cocktails. The tourism attractions had double-digit attendance growth in 2016 compared with the prior year, and attendance has shot up 300 percent in the past decade, the group said.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/business/2017/01/25/kentucky-bourbon/97063640/

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Writers museum in Chicago sets opening date" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Writers museum in Chicago sets opening date" from the Chicago Tribune

The American Writers Museum, a long-gestating new Chicago institution, has set an opening date of May 16, the museum announced Tuesday.

Located at 180 N. Michigan Ave., the museum will celebrate authors from Mark Twain to Dr. Seuss, it said in a release, and has signed on 55 writers’ homes and museums around the country as affiliates. Adult admission will be $12.

The 11,000-square-foot, second-floor museum is calling some of its exhibits The Mind of a Writer, A Writer’s Room, and Word Play. One feature will allow visitors to follow the travels of such peripatetic authors as Jack Kerouac and John Steinbeck.

The idea was sparked and fueled by Malcolm O'Hagan, a retired engineer and book enthusiast. O’Hagan is an Irish native who spent 15 years as president of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/ct-writers-museum-in-chicago-sets-opening-date-20170124-column.html

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Sleeping Bear beach rated world-class" from the Detroit News

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Sleeping Bear beach rated world-class" from the Detroit News

One of Michigan’s popular vacation destinations has been named as having one of the best beaches in the world.

National Geographic has recognized Sleeping Bear Point, which is part of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, as one of the best 21 beaches in the world. It’s highlighted as an ideal destination for dune walkers.

In the publication’s summary of the beach, author Kimberley Lovato writes:

“Pure freshwater and 450-foot bluffs mean eyes-open swimming and vast views over Lake Michigan. Walk from the former Sleeping Bear Point Coast Guard Station, now a maritime museum, or along the Sleeping Bear Point Trail over low-lying dunes to the beach. In the distance look for North and South Manitou Islands, prime spots for hiking and camping.”

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/michigan/2017/01/24/sleeping-bear-beach/97011100/

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Lambeau Field of dreams: New Titletown District a score for Green Bay" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Lambeau Field of dreams: New Titletown District a score for Green Bay" from the Chicago Tribune

Few would bet big on a team with a 4-6 record and four-game losing streak, but the wily Green Bay Packers ended up getting one step away from the Super Bowl despite a lackluster start to the 2016 season.

The Packers' unlikely comeback isn't the only welcome development emanating from the smallest city in the NFL and the only publicly owned team in major pro sports. Emerging from 34 acres of tundra by Lambeau Field is the $130 million Titletown District that promises to give travelers reasons other than football to visit Green Bay, Wis.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-titletown-district-green-bay-travel-0205-20170123-story.html

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Skiing Lutsen, the Midwest answer to Aspen" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Skiing Lutsen, the Midwest answer to Aspen" from the Chicago Tribune

Making the best of low elevations and short runs, Midwestern skiers become masters of the chairlift. Not that this is a bad thing. Just ask decorated downhiller Lindsey Vonn, who honed her champion's technique lapping the lanes at tiny Buck Hill in a suburb south of Minneapolis. But the pride of Midwestern ski resorts lies another 250 or so miles north of Buck Hill, in Lutsen, Minn.

On the north shore of Lake Superior, Lutsen Mountains is the region's largest resort, with 95 runs spread across four mountains. From the tops of these peaks, skiers have the vast expanse of Lake Superior stretching to the horizon, like a limitless Lake Tahoe.

Last ski season, Lutsen added a new gondola that whisks skiers in cherry red capsules from the top of one mountain to another, like a smaller version of the Peak 2 Peak Gondola at Whistler Blackcomb in British Columbia. Lutsen's 825-foot vertical rise doesn't compare to anything in Utah, Colorado or even New Mexico, but, in lieu of Aspen Snowmass in Colorado or Boyne Highlands in Michigan, two of our favorites, my family and I made the long, wintry trip to find out how the best of the Midwest compares with the rest by the following four critical metrics.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-lusten-minnesota-ski-travel-0122-20170110-story.html

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "New name: Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation" from the Detroit News

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "New name: Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation" from the Detroit News

What’s in a name?

A lot, according to the president of The Henry Ford in Dearborn, which has officially changed the name of its museum to the Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation.

“This has been in the works for years,” said Patricia Mooradian, who’s headed the celebrated indoor and outdoor educational complex for the past 17 years.

“There are lots of museums that feature certain aspects of innovation,” she added, “but our entire collection speaks to innovation, and that really sets us apart.” Adding the words “American Innovation” to the museum title, she noted, “clearly defines its focus.”

Part of the impetus came from surveys that revealed many visitors were foggy on the museum’s purpose.

While Michigan residents are usually in the know, Mooradian said, 35 percent of the 1.8 million visitors annually come from out of state or abroad.

“When we interviewed them,” she added, “a large majority said they thought the museum was all about Henry Ford, the man, or just the automobile.”

It’s the second rebranding the 88-year-old institution has undergone in recent years.

In 2003, all the constituent parts of the Dearborn campus — the museum, Greenfield Village and the Ford Rouge Factory Tour — were grouped together under the rubric, The Henry Ford.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/entertainment/arts/2017/01/23/henry-ford-museum-name-change-museum-american-innovation/96857622/

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Illinois Holocaust Museum bets on rock 'n' roll" from Crain's Chicago

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Illinois Holocaust Museum bets on rock 'n' roll" from Crain's Chicago

In 1931, 11-year-old Wolodia Grajonca arrived in the United States from Berlin with little more than a handful of photos and a prayer book. Over the years, he tapped into the burgeoning rock music scene and turned himself into Bill Graham, a music promoter known for putting San Francisco's Fillmore Auditorium on the map, organizing the first Live Aid, and promoting Janis Joplin and other Hall of Fame acts.

In July, the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center will open "Bill Graham & the Rock & Roll Revolution." The exhibit, a vast collection of photos, costumes, broken guitars and posters, shows how Graham, a Holocaust refugee, built a spectacular life and how his early hardships informed his success.

Executives hope that the exhibit, like Museum of Contemporary Art's "David Bowie Is" 2014 blockbuster, will boost attendance. Located in a $45 million Stanley Tigerman-designed building in Skokie, about 20 miles northwest of the Loop, the Holocaust Museum is not exactly on Chicago tourism's well-worn path. Yet it's the third-largest of its kind in the world, after Yad Vashem World Holocaust Center in Jerusalem and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20170121/ISSUE01/170129968/illinois-holocaust-museum-bets-on-rock-n-roll#utm_medium=email&utm_source=ccb-dailyalert&utm_campaign=ccb-dailyalert-20170123