Monday, September 19, 2016

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Underground adventures await in Midwest caves" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Underground adventures await in Midwest caves" from the Chicago Tribune

You're forgiven if you've never heard of Squire Boone. Daniel Boone's kid brother, Squire was overshadowed by his legendary sibling's courageous expeditions into uncharted territory, despite the fact that the two often traveled together.

"Daniel was the lucky one. He had people write down all his exploits," said Claudia Yundt, the director of southern Indiana's Squire Boone Caverns. About 30 miles west of Louisville, Ky., the cave may be the only place where Squire, not Daniel, is the one who is revered.

The Boones stumbled across the cave in 1790 during a westward exploration.

"They were following the creek that runs beside the caverns when they discovered the spring that comes from our cave," Yundt noted.

The cave still delights visitors with its streams and waterfalls. Each day, more than a million gallons of water flow through the caverns.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-midwest-caves-travel-1002-20160919-story.html

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Beliefs aside, Noah's Ark in Kentucky is something to see" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Beliefs aside, Noah's Ark in Kentucky is something to see" from the Chicago Tribune

I'd been on Noah's Ark all of 20 minutes when the question that hung over every step was finally put to me: "Do you believe?"

It came from a man with a thin beard named Travis, who wore a Captain America T-shirt and had an excitable look in his eye. He was touring the new, five-story Ark Encounter with his wife and daughters after driving three hours from central Indiana.

We stood on the ark's second floor, in front of a display about the Garden of Eden, and Travis had just explained to one of his girls that some people believe the fabled garden still exists somewhere on the planet. Maybe it's in the Bermuda Triangle, he said. Or near the Euphrates River. Otherwise, it might be suspended somewhere between heaven and Earth.

Continued on website.

 Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-noahs-ark-encounter-kentucky-travel-0913-20160902-story.html

Friday, September 16, 2016

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "It's a go: Streetcar finally opens" from Cincinnati.com

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "It's a go: Streetcar finally opens" from Cincinnati.com 

Finally.

Cincinnati's long-awaited streetcar opened its doors to the public at noon on Friday, and began running along the 3.6-mile loop through Downtown and Over-the-Rhine. It was the first time in 65 years Cincinnati had an operating streetcar.

It was a festive atmosphere in Washington Park as 1,000 people gathered for the opening day ceremony, even before the speakers hit the stage after 10 a.m. A rainy day, initially, yielded to overcast skies and later sunshine by the late morning.

With a backdrop of Music Hall and streetcar vehicles, 14 politicians, administrators and streetcar champions told attendees how the streetcar's opening was a remarkable moment in Cincinnati's history.

Former Mayor Mark Mallory and other champions of the streetcar – officially known as the Cincinnati Bell Connector – touted it as a "transformational" project that has overcome multiple political and funding hurdles over the past decade.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/politics/2016/09/09/updates-streetcar-opening-day/90116412/

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "How Milwaukee Shook Off the Rust" from Politico

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "How Milwaukee Shook Off the Rust" from Politico

The drive into Milwaukee once offered a sweeping vista of the American industrial apocalypse. 

Abandoned factories and decaying smokestacks cast shadows over rusting rail yards, weed-choked lots, heaps of junked automobiles and small mountains of sand, coal and salt. The odor from the slaughterhouses, a massive coal-fired power plant and, especially, a yeast factory wafted up to the traffic, while waste from a century and a half of tanning leather, pouring steel and butchering beasts seeped into the river below. Once the beating heart of this great industrial city, the Menomonee River Valley had become, in the words of a mid-1980s Milwaukee Journal reporter, “an ugly, rust-colored lesion on the city’s midsection.”

Fast-forward two decades and Wisconsin’s most visible eyesore is barely recognizable. Down in the valley floor—four miles long and a half-mile wide—cyclists spin down the Hank Aaron State Trail, while elementary school classes watch great blue herons pick their way through the marshes. Salmon and steelhead trout run up the river in fall and spring respectively. Kids play on soccer fields, while adults play games of chance in the Potawatomi tribe’s $450 million casino, its 21-story tall glass and steel hotel tower looking down on rebuilt streets, viaducts and landscaping and the $75 million Harley-Davidson Museum, now one of the city’s biggest tourist attractions.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/08/milwaukee-what-works-industrial-clean-up-214174

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Indianapolis hosts Vonnegut festivals, premiere of his opera" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Indianapolis hosts Vonnegut festivals, premiere of his opera" from the Chicago Tribune

Two festivals and the world premiere of an opera that Kurt Vonnegut finished shortly before his death will celebrate the writer's legacy this fall in his hometown, Indianapolis.

"Happy Birthday, Wanda June," based on Vonnegut's play by the same name, will be performed for the first time Sept. 16-18. The opera will be staged right after the Vonnegut's World festival, Sept. 7-14.

The Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library will host events Sept. 26-30 coinciding with the American Library Association's Banned Books Week. Vonnegut's novel "Slaughterhouse-Five" was banned by some schools and communities for its anti-war, anti-establishment themes.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-indianapolis-vonnegut-opera-20160811-story.html

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Scenery inspires local artists in Saugatuck, the 'Art Coast of Michigan'" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Scenery inspires local artists in Saugatuck, the 'Art Coast of Michigan'" from the Chicago Tribune

Give an old log to Marcia Perry, and she will create a work of art.

"I'm a sculptor who brings trees back to life," explained Perry, one of many artists who live in or near Saugatuck on Michigan's west coast, a nearly three-hour drive from Chicago.

Our family has made myriad visits over the years to this quaint resort village. We come for the beach, the boating, the unique shops and restaurants. But this time, I wanted to explore what makes this area "The Art Coast of Michigan," where some 35 art galleries inhabit this small town and neighboring Douglas.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-saugatuck-art-galleries-travel-0828-20160812-story.html

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Popular Mississippi River cruises offer fresh view of American history" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Popular Mississippi River cruises offer fresh view of American history" from the Chicago Tribune

When it comes to river cruises, most Americans look to Europe for storybook waterways like the Danube, Rhine and Seine. Lots of rivers, lots of ships, lots of itineraries.

But the Mississippi River, right here at home, is getting a fresh look from travelers who want to experience a cruise without having to fly to another continent.

When I cruised on the 436-passenger paddle-wheeler American Queen in July, I had tamped down my expectations. How, after all, could St. Louis compare to Paris? How would rows of high corn and lush green tobacco fields measure up to terraced vineyards that produce some of the world's finest wines? Seriously, grits or gougeres?

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/sc-mississippi-river-cruise-travel-0823-20160815-story.html