Saturday, May 20, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Falling for Frank Lloyd Wright in Pennsylvania's Laurel Highlands" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Falling for Frank Lloyd Wright in Pennsylvania's Laurel Highlands" from the Chicago Tribune

Touring three Frank Lloyd Wright houses in two days will make a visitor sure of two things.

No. 1: The brilliant, phenomenally talented architect envisioned houses that remain functional as well as beautiful well over half a century after construction.

No. 2: This eccentric, irascible man would have caused occasional — perhaps regular — bouts of apoplexy in homeowners tying their dreams and finances to him.

Consider Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr., who saw the cost of his weekend home, Fallingwater, rise from an estimated $30,000 to $155,000 in the mid-1930s, when skilled laborers on the project earned 75 cents an hour.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-wright-homes-laurel-highlands-pennsylvania-travel-0514-20170428-story.html

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Tiny Bayfield, Wis., strikes improbable gold with Big Top" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Tiny Bayfield, Wis., strikes improbable gold with Big Top" from the Chicago Tribune 

Imagine a time when musical artists — not circus barkers or snake-handlers — held summertime sway over crowds under a big top.

And if you can't get a toward-the-front seat to hear the likes of Bonnie Raitt, Delbert McClinton, Ricky Skaggs, Ziggy Marley or the Beach Boys, the sides of the 11,200-square-foot tent do roll up, and you can sit on the grassy hill with crickets chirping to your sides, the headliners just down in front, and a stunning evening view of Lake Superior beyond that.

Welcome to Lake Superior Big Top Chautauqua (www.bigtop.org), on Wisconsin's northern coast. It's one of the few canvas-clad performing arts centers in the country, and you'll find it in what is officially the smallest city in Wisconsin, with 487 year-round residents.

Continued on website:

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-big-top-chautauqua-bayfield-wisconsin-travel-0521-20170509-story.html

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "100 hours of music — and much more — at Elkhart, Ind. jazz fest" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "100 hours of music — and much more — at Elkhart, Ind. jazz fest" from the Chicago Tribune

They'll be dancing in the streets in downtown Elkhart starting June 23, when the sights and sounds of the city's annual jazz festival fill the air for the 30th time.

This is no "happening" for a throwback crowd. It's a huge, diverse block party for all ages set around 100 hours of music played by an eclectic lineup of performers over three days.

Musicians, such as legendary pianist Ramsey Lewis, pop crossover artist Ben Folds, the Elkhart County Symphony, award-winning high school jazz bands and local gospel choirs will fill seven stages, ranging from the exquisitely renovated 1,700-seat Lerner Theatre to setups in the streets. Performers also will lead workshops for young musicians.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-elkhart-jazz-festival-travel-0604-20170516-story.html

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: The QLINE: What to see and where to visit near each stop" from Curbed Detroit

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: The QLINE: What to see and where to visit near each stop" from Curbed Detroit

The QLINE, after years of discussion and anticipation, will finally open for riders on May 12. Yes, it runs 3.3 miles down Woodward and back. Since it’s been in development, it has spurred a lot of development in its path. It should make it easier for many who live nearby to get to and from downtown and Midtown.

It’s also along the path of many major landmarks, museums, and buildings in Detroit. If you don’t live along its path and you want to spend the day sightseeing, or if you’re visiting the city, there are many places to stop along the way.

Will it become so successful that they’ll continue it down Woodward into the suburbs? We hope so. Until then, here are a few places you can visit right now. Did we forget something? Let us know in the comments or drop us a note on the tip line.

We’ll have more updates and info on the QLINE as the grand opening gets closer. Check the M-1 Rail website for more information. There’s a big party planned, FYI.

Continued on website.

Link:
https://detroit.curbed.com/maps/qline-m1rail-stops-landmarks

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Hitting the highlights on Wisconsin's new 200-mile Frank Lloyd Wright trail" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Hitting the highlights on Wisconsin's new 200-mile Frank Lloyd Wright trail" from the Chicago Tribune

With their clean, horizontal lines and open floor plans, many Frank Lloyd Wright buildings still feel modern today — a testament to the ingenuity and staying power of America's most famous architect, born 150 years ago June 8.

The prolific pioneer of organic architecture built in 36 states as well as Canada and Japan before he died in 1959, a few weeks shy of 92.

His greatest hits album includes iconic creations like Fallingwater in Pennsylvania and the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

The Chicago area is a rich showcase for his handiwork, boasting more Wright buildings than anywhere else in the world.

But for the ultimate Wright pilgrimage, head to Wisconsin. The state recently rolled out the new Frank Lloyd Wright Trail (www.travelwisconsin.com/frank-lloyd-wright), a 200-mile route made up of nine key Wright sites. More than 100 brown signs are stationed along the self-guided driving tour, whose highlights stretch from Racine on the banks of Lake Michigan all the way west to Richland Center, where the outspoken architect was born in 1867.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/sc-frank-lloyd-wright-wisconsin-trail-travel-0509-20170428-story.html

Sunday, April 30, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Like the Driehaus Mansion? Check this out." from Crain's

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Like the Driehaus Mansion? Check this out." from Crain's

The grandson of the owner of the Hegeler Carus Mansion in La Salle left it to a foundation with one stipulation: that nothing in it be sold. The result is a time capsule from the 19th century.

Ninety-five miles southwest of Chicago stands a 57-room Second Empire mansion slowly undergoing a return to its 19th-century splendor. It is connected to Chicago by its creators, Water Tower architect William W. Boyington and interior designer William August Fiedler, who is known for his work in the 1879 Samuel N. Nickerson mansion on Chicago's North Side, now the Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

Continued on website

Link: http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20170428/ISSUE03/170429875#utm_medium=email&utm_source=ccb-morning10&utm_campaign=ccb-morning10-20170428

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Hiking Wisconsin's 'Thousand-Miler' Ice Age Trail" from the Chicago Tribune

Great Lakes and Upper South in the News: "Hiking Wisconsin's 'Thousand-Miler' Ice Age Trail" from the Chicago Tribune

Chances are you've heard of the Appalachian Trail, the hiking path that runs 2,179 miles (3,507 kilometers) from Georgia to Maine. You may also be familiar with the Pacific Crest Trail, a 2,650-mile (4,265-kilometer) route from California to Canada.

But Melanie Radzicki McManus hopes to bring more attention to that route with a new book, "Thousand-Miler." McManus, 55, set women's records for fastest-known times on the Ice Age Trail, completing it in 36 days in 2013 and 34 days in 2015.

Continued on website.

Link:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/travel/ct-ice-age-trail-wisconsin-20170424-story.html